Human Flower Project


Orrington, MAINE USA

flag flower bed
Murrieta, CALIFORNIA USA

parker basket thumb
Princeton, MAINE USA

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Chiltepin - Tongues on the Scales


Each of the Southwest’s native chilis has its day in the sun; pull over for chiltepin.


image

Jack Tobar collected tiny, jolting chiltepins after work

September 18, 2010, Austin, Texas.

Photo: Human Flower Project

A gentle knock.

Two passers-by had come to the door asking permission to pick the tiny chilis from bushes on our corner, just what happened a year ago.  Chiltepin season is upon us in Central Texas. Jack Tobar and a friend had knocked off work and caught sight of the tiny “bird peppers” (so called because birds like them and sow them, too). With our blessing, the two men spent a good half hour harvesting from five Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum plants and were off, we hope, for an evening muy piquante.

This spice is a favorite among lots of Mexican, Mexican-American, and South Texas cooks, though Tobar’s pickin-partner, who declined to give his name, said the chilis don’t taste good alone. He recommended making a simple salsa by crushing the chiltepins in a mortar with red and green tomatoes and a pinch of salt. It’s delicious, he said, on tacos, eggs, meat – just about anything that could use a bit of a kick.


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Posted by Julie on 09/22 at 04:53 PM
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